Exchange for Change

About
Applying
What's included
When/Where
Quotes
About

Volunteer in Nepal after the earthquake, take your trip off the beaten path with a one-month cultural exchange and volunteering experience.  

This month-long cultural exchange program includes a short orientation in Kathmandu followed by homestay with Nepali families and volunteering in a rural village, giving you real insight into the local culture and lifestyle and a chance to contribute to post-earthquake rebuilding efforts.

Don’t miss this opportunity to make an impact!

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Applying
The program is open to people ages 20-30, generally people who are backpacking in the area and looking for a meaningful add-on to their trip.

Are you the right person for the job? Volunteering isn’t easy, but applying is. Just follow these easy steps:

1. Send an email to info@tevelbtzedek.org.

2. Relevant candidates will be contacted for an interview (in-person in Israel or Nepal or via Skype in other locations)

3. Accepted participants will provide medical and legal clearance

4. After receiving final acceptance participants will sign a contract of commitment to secure their place in the program.

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What's included
  • 3-5 day orientation in Kathmandu (including room and board)
  • Homestay including room and full board in a Nepali village
  • Staff supervision and mentoring

The program costs $15 a day that goes to cover the costs of homestay in the village as well as training and staff.

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When/Where

When?

The program takes place during the the tourist seasons in Nepal (September-November and February-June).

Upcoming sessions

March 15-April 9, 2017

April 23-May 23, 2017

We are unable to run the program during the summer months (June-August) due to the weather conditions during the monsoon season. 

Where?

The program is currently active in the village of Manegau, about two hours out of Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. There are many other villages in close proximity, agricultural areas and a Tibetan-Buddhist monastery, Namo Budha.

There are approximately seventy-five families in Managau, the majority of which are from the Tamang ethnic group. There are also several families from the “untouchable” Dalit caste, the lowest caste in Nepal. The village residents include all ages, although many of the adult males work outside of the village, either in Kathmandu or on the gulf countries. Women are busy with housework- carrying water, cutting grass and straw to feed the livestock (buffalo, goats and cattle) and with cooking. There is a severe water shortage in the village, and there is no running water in the villagers homes. Many of the homes of the villagers were damaged or destroyed in the April 2015 earthquake.

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Quotes
“A member of the women’s empowerment group that I was working with once told me “thank you for what you are doing here.” I really thought that I had to thank her in return, not to be polite, but because I felt I had gained and learned so much with all those women. While teaching empowerment, I got empowered myself. I felt the same way while teaching journalism to children. Those kids are so strong and courageous that one can learn a lot from them. Some of them work before and after school, and have hard living conditions, and yet they are always very optimistic and see the future with confidence. I came to Nepal because I wanted to give, but I feel that I received much more than I could dream of.”
Roni, volunteered in Nepal

 

click here for more stories from the field

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